Philosophy of love

Philosophy of love

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Love

Types of love

Affection
Bonding
Broken heart
Compassionate love
Conjugal love
Courtly love

troubadours

Falling in love
Free love
Friendship

romantic

Interpersonal relationship
Intimacy
Limerence
Love addiction
Love at first sight
Love triangle
Loving-kindness
Lovesickness
Lovestruck
Obsessive love
Passion
Puppy love
Relationship
Self-love

Amour de soi

Unconditional love
Unrequited love

Cultural views

Arabic

Ishq

Chinese

Ren

Greek

words for love
Agape
Eros
Philia
Platonic
Storge
Xenia

Indian

Kama
Bhakti

Jewish

Chesed

Latin

Amore
Charity
Romance

Related

Biological basis
Love letter
Valentine’s Day
Philosophy
Religious views

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Philosophy of love is the field of social philosophy and ethics that attempts to explain the nature of love.[1]

Contents

1 Current theories
2 Western traditions

2.1 Classical roots
2.2 Petrarchism
2.3 Gallic scepticism
2.4 Western philosophers of love

3 Eastern traditions
4 See also
5 References
6 Further reading
7 External links

Current theories[edit]

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There are many different theories that attempt to explain what love is, and what function it serves. It would be very difficult to explain love to a hypothetical person who had not himself or herself experienced love or being loved. In fact, to such a person love would appear to be quite strange if not outright irrational behavior. Among the prevailing types of theories that attempt to account for the existence of love there are: psychological theories, the vast majority of which consider love to be very healthy behavior; there are evolutionary theories that hold that love is part of the process of natural selection; there are spiritual theories that may, for instance consider love to be a gift from God; there are also theories that consider love to be an unexplainable mystery, very much like a mystical experience.
Western traditions[edit]
Classical roots[edit]
Setting aside Empedocles’s view of Eros as the force binding the world together,[2] the roots of the classical philosophy of love go back to Plato’s Symposium.[3] In Plato’s Symposium dig deeper into the idea of love and bringing different interpretation and point of view
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